Simply Haiku: A Quarterly Journal of Japanese Short Form Poetry
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Autumn 2007, vol 5 no 3

RENKU
 

Tsukeku : Added Verses

       

a second hand,
the cicada,
with little time

rw    

someone enters the post office
with a lot of books

iy    

* * * *

 
     

painting over
the blackbird's complaint
with morning

rw    

by the window
a swedish doll is displayed

iy    

* * * *

 
     

night thickens . . .
licking her smile from
the bullfrog's tongue

rw    

black strong coffee
is my taste

iy    

* * * *

 
     

was that you, son,
chasing stars with
a butterfly net?

rw    

a straw hat is left
on the doorway

iy    

* * * *

 
     

dark dreams
of crayfish bursting
with summer

rw    

the full moon is reflected
on the watery rice field

iy    

* * * *

 
     

will it hurt you
to lift a leaf while the
ants are working?

rw    

after crying
a girl kisses me

iy    

* * * *

 
     

sunrise . . .
a minnow darts
through my smile

rw    

bread crumbs dropped
from my lunch box

iy    

* * * *

 
     

twilight . . .
a blossom whispering,
"some day"

rw    

pink scarf wrapped
about her white neck

iy    

* * * *

 
     

morning frost . . .
she visits me wearing
a mask

rw    

rose smell of her perfume
floating

iy    

* * * *

 
     

hoarfrost . . .
my shadow tossed in
a pile of laundry

rw    

thinking of him
traveling in China

iy    

* * * *

 
     

mother washes
dishes and onions in
the same breath

rw    

a house cat sleeps
a baseball game on TV

iy    

* * * *

 
     

a harvest moon,
and no one to pluck
it from the sky

rw    

how many times
have you kissed me through the window?

iy    

* * * *

 
     

what are you
thinking, goldfish, from the
inside looking out?

rw    

jazz melody
comforts me in the tea house

iy    
     

In an earlier issue of Simply Haiku, Ikuyo Yoshimura, professor of English at Asahi University in Gifu, asked students in one of her classes to Tsuke-ku, i.e., write verses linking to haiku sent to her by Robert Wilson, Managing Editor and Owner of Simply Haiku. Sharing the results with our readers, she explains that "Tsuke-Ku is a part of Renku and becoming popular among Japanese haiku poets. It makes deep and wide poetry space, putting two lines to the first three lines, just like haiku and hai-ga."

In this issue, Prof. Yoshimura herself adds two-line verses to selected haiku by Robert Wilson.

 

Copyright 2007: Simply Haiku