Simply Haiku: A Quarterly Journal of Japanese Short Form Poetry
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Autumn 2006, vol 4 no 3

RENKU

Tsukeku: Added Verses*

       

twilight dawn---
the cricket nurses
his sore leg

Robert    

breeze blows
the dog closes his eyes

Mariko    
 
     

like a melon,
her belly, swathed
in shadow

Robert    

a small mosquito flies
around the desk light

Toshiko    
 
     

summer coolness
---your kiss
the morning after

Robert    

leaving my party dress
and pleasant memory

Yukari    
 
     

summer coolness
---your kiss
the morning after

Robert    

problematic angel
lies down my side

Ayako    
 
     

cricket song
---and the far off cry
of coyotes

Robert    

into vine trail
lady bugs go to sleep

Miyuki    
       
pale moon---
the stillness of
granite walls
Robert    
no one in the house
just wind sways the curtain
Miyuki    
 
     
moonless night---
wishing the stars were
more than stars
Robert    
a mother frog tells
her baby’s fortune
Nami    
 
     
moonless night---
wishing the stars were
more than stars
Robert    
looking down from the hill
street lights shine
Emiko    
 
     
cricket song
---and the far off cry
of coyotes
Robert    
negro spiritual
heard from the radio all night
Rie    
 
     
born without
a shadow,
the lowly worm
Robert    
a cat under the eaves
scowls the weakness on the ground
Yumi    
 
     

moonless light---
a stand of young trees
huddle together

Robert    
a coffee paper cup
left on the picnic table
Ikuyo    
       

moonless light---
a stand of young trees
huddle together

Robert    

old ladies enjoy
chewing the fat

Yuko    
   
*Ikuyo Yoshimura, an associate professor of English at Asahi University in Gifu, asked students in one of her classes to Tsuke-ku, i.e., write verses linking to haiku sent to her by Robert Wilson, Managing Editor and Owner of Simply Haiku. Sharing the results with SH readers, she explains that "Tsuke-Ku is a part of Renku and becoming popular among Japanese haiku poets. It makes deep and wide poetry space, putting two lines to the first three lines, just like haiku and hai-ga."

Copyright 2006: Simply Haiku